Response 53967140

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Risks

1. Does the Policing 2026 strategy identify and acknowledge the main risks, challenges, opportunities and demands likely to impact on policing over the next 10 years?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No
Not sure
We would welcome any view you have.
It acknowledges (though then contradicts itself) in stating that local policing has suffered during the Police Reform period and introduction to Police Scotland. The numbers of local uniformed officers BASED in local communities has reduced significantly to levels that would not have been believed about 6 years ago. Local uniformed officers are being stretched to breaking point and the current model is not sustainable. The 2026 Strategy recognises this and states that officers currently working in support roles (such as Corporate Services) need to be reduced and these officers returned to operational policing. The huge loss of civilian staff has been a massive loss to policing in Scotland. The significant restructure of C3 Division has swallowed up huge numbers of police officers; the majority of whom have come from front-line operational policing in our communities. With Dundee taking over management of calls in A and N Divisions, then D Division has suffered disproportionately with police officers being sucked into the ACR, to the detriment of the local communities in Tayside and to the few officers left struggling with call-demand.

Focus

2. Do you agree the main areas of focus proposed within the Policing 2026 strategy are the right ones to deliver an enhanced policing service?

Please select one item
Strongly agree
Ticked Mostly agree
Not sure
Mostly disagree
Strongly disagree
Please tell us why you think these are the right or wrong areas of focus?
Collaborative working is essential but I don't have confidence that partner agencies will strive to improve in the same fashion that Police Scotland has the same ambition to achieve. For instance, will NHS boards across Scotland invest in improving in emergency psychiatric services, including out-of-hours provision to enable efficient working practices between police and NHS to the benefit of patients. On many occasions Police Scotland will provide a timeous and quality service only to be hand-tied by NHS inefficiencies. I also fear that there will be an over-reliance on new technologies. Whilst the organisation is right to improve its ICT capacity, which has been woefully poor, many rural communities do not have public CCTV systems for example. The Policing 2026 document makes great claims as to what may be possible in 2026, however this may be to the greatest benefit of big cities. I doubt many towns across Scotland with populations around 10,000 - 20,000 will have the same CCTV / ICT investment to realise your ambitions. What provision is being made for Business Continuity if you become over-reliant on new technologies?

Methods

3. Do you agree the methods proposed within this strategy are the right ones to deliver an improved policing service?

Please select one item
Strongly agree
Ticked Mostly agree
Not sure
Mostly disagree
Strongly disagree
Please tell us why you think this is the right or wrong approach?
I admire the ambition, but I'm not fully confident that you'll be able to deliver.

Performance

4. The Policing 2026 Strategy states that public confidence will be a key measure of success and the effectiveness of Police performance. Do you agree with this approach?

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Strongly agree
Mostly agree
Ticked Not sure
Mostly disagree
Strongly disagree
We would welcome any views you have
The majority of decent law-abiding citizens never think of the police, let alone its effectiveness. On the rare occasion they might call the police (once in twenty/thirty years?), they want a smart, helpful officer listen to their concerns, deal with it effectively and provide feedback. They won't be interested in organisational change etc. Local councillors, community councils, and perhaps leaders in local community groups liaise with the police, and probably fill in your surveys, but they know they're not getting the same level of service that they got several years ago under legacy arrangements. There are far too few officers left on the street that we can't provide the same support to community groups and community leaders that we used to. As an operational supervisor/manager with extensive service in policing, I know my officers can't provide the same level of service to the victims of crime that they could a few years ago. They are run ragged. I try to liaise with my community leaders/councillors, but I'm also responsible for providing operational supervision for a massive rural area with competing demands. I do the job of at least 5 officers of the same rank from a few years ago. It is not sustainable. I can not provide the same level of support and guidance to my officers as I did years ago. I cannot provide the same level of contact with community leaders as I did years ago. They are sympathetic to my situation, but it is depressing that our service levels have hugely worsened over the years. I welcome any attempts to improve this, but I am sceptical that you will realise your admirable ambitions.

Workforce

5. The Policing 2026 strategy highlights that we will need to re-shape our organisation with a workforce focussed on having the right skills and capacity to meet future challenges. Do you agree with this approach?

Please select one item
Strongly agree
Ticked Mostly agree
Not sure
Mostly disagree
Strongly disagree
We would welcome any views you have.
Please don't think that training through the Moodle platform will ever be a good thing. The organisation needs to invest in its staff, but the training has to be good, and whilst acknowledging that there will also need to be financial responsibility, if you go for the cheapest training option, you'll get the inevitable results.

Clear & Understandable

6. Is the strategy presented in a clear and understandable way?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No

Other views

7. We would welcome any additional views you have on our strategy and how it will affect you, or any other person.

We would welcome any views you have.
Localism is great. As a community officer (manager) within Police Scotland, my hands are tied, and my officers are hand-tied as we spend the vast majority of our time back-filling for the disgraceful shortfall in operational officers in our area. Discussed this with the Divisional Commander. Provided statistical evidence in form of Scottish Indices of Multiple Deprivation, call demand, Threat, Risk & Harm. Got fobbed off with a single sentence. Other senior officer have challenged our present model. Similarly ignored. I would love my community officers a reasonable chance to do their job and work towards the themes referred to in 'Localism', but with the MASSIVE reduction in response officers in our area in the last few years, our community officers spend a disproportionately huge amount of time backfilling for response officers. I'm conscious that in other parts of the country community officers are better protected. As a manager, that is part of my job, but when the call demand of Priority 1 and Priority 2 calls outstrips the fragile number of response officers available (on daily / hourly basis), then my community officers MUST step in to assist.

About you

10. Are you responding as an individual or an organisation?

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(Required)
Ticked I am answering as an individual
I am answering on behalf of an organisation